Stormwater Quality Management Committee
Clark County Regional Flood Control District
600 S. Grand Central Pkwy. Las Vegas, NV 89106

SECONDARY CONTAINMENT - Chemicals and/or hazardous substances in drums or tanks should be kept covered and stored in secondary containment. Substances may include, but are not limited to fuels, lubricants, flammable liquids, and corrosives. Spills of materials or chemicals should be contained and cleaned up immediately. Secondary containment systems must be able to hold the volume of the largest container in the storage area.

OUTDOOR COVERED STORAGE - Outdoor storage areas are covered to prevent stormwater contact. Proper design of outdoor storage areas for materials reduces opportunity for toxic compounds, oil and grease, heavy metals, nutrients, suspended solids, and other pollutants to enter the stormwater conveyance system. Construct a berm around the perimeter of the material storage area to prevent the run-on of uncontaminated stormwater from adjacent areas as well as runoff of stormwater from the material.

COVERING DRY GOODS - Dry goods stored outside should be protected from rainfall to prevent stormwater contact. Dry goods should be covered with a temporary waterproof covering made of polyethylene, polypropylene, or hypalon. Keep covers in place at all times when work is not occurring. Slope paved areas to minimize the pooling of water on the site, particularly with materials that may leach pollutants into stormwater.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING PRACTICES - Make every effort to prevent spills. When they do occur, clean them up immediately with absorbent materials. Never wash spills into a storm drain. Repair leaky equipment and clean spills with absorbent materials.
Examples of Poor BMP Implementation:
POOR HOUSEKEEPING PRACTICES - This picture demonstrates the improper handling of chemicals and illegal dumping of petroleum products. Good housekeeping is the key to good environmental management. Keeping a clean work place with wastes being disposed of properly makes good sense for all.
PRESSURE WASHING OUTDOOR SURFACES - This picture demonstrates how pressure washing of parking areas allows soap and oily wastewater to enter the storm drain system. Pressure washing outdoor surfaces should never be discharged to a storm drain. The preferred method is dry sweep the surface. However, if pressure washing is used storm drains should be covered, or the path to the drain should be blocked during pressure washing. Collected wastewater can be pumped into a sanitary sewer clean out, or, in some instances discharged to a landscaped area.
ILLEGAL DISCHARGE OF WASTEWATER - This picture demonstrates how toxic wastewater is disposed of in an inappropriate manner. Discharge of wastewater and chemicals are not allowed to enter storm drains. Common mistakes in disposing of wastewater include hosing down industrial storage areas, sidewalks and driveways; discharging wastewater to stormwater; washing of vehicles in the street.

POOR REPAIR PRACTICES - This picture demonstrates how poor repair practices can lead to leaky equipment. Make every effort to prevent spills. When they do occur, clean them up immediately with absorbent materials. Never wash spills into a storm drain. Repair leaky equipment and clean spills with absorbent materials.

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